Sir Francis Bacon (1561 – 1626) said “ipsa scientia potestas est” or “knowledge itself is power”. He may have been a famous philosopher, statesman, scientist and author, but I have to respectfully disagree! 
 
Every day I see people in the process of learning without changing. They read a book or attend a workshop, they learn the content, they go back to work and guess what… nothing changes! They have what Anne Dranitaris calls ‘inactive knowing’. 
 
You see it’s not what you know that makes a difference, it’s what you do with what you know, and what you practice over and over and over again until it causes you to transform new knowledge into new behaviours. This doesn’t just miraculously happen from reading a book or attending a workshop. You can read all the diet books in the world and never lose a pound - believe me I know!
 
For knowledge to become powerful you have to move from inactive knowing to activeknowing. It’s what you do after reading the book or attending the workshop that matters. The key is the experimenting, the practicing and the teaching of others.
 
Over the years I have meet many highly qualified people who know a lot about leadership, but that said, I would not let them loose with my goats let alone let them lead human beings. It seems there is a mighty big gap between inactive knowing and active knowing!
 
As John Ruskin says “What we think or what we know, or what we believe is, in the end, of little consequence. The only consequence is what we do.”


Share This Article

What would a leader do?

Learning without changing

Sir Francis Bacon (1561 – 1626) said “ipsa scientia potestas est” or “knowledge itself is power”. He may have been a famous philosopher, statesman, scientist and author, but I have to respectfully disagree! 


Read More

Subscribe: Sign up to receive news and updates